South Australia welcomes cannabis industry leaders

Medicinal cannabis professionals are in Adelaide today for a conference exploring the industry’s future in South Australia.

The Future of Medicinal Cannabis symposium features a series of national and global speakers who will discuss the challenges and opportunities of the medicinal cannabis trade including regulation, launching a global business and defining the cannabis pharmacopeia.

Minister for Industry and Skills, David Pisoni who will be among the key speakers, said business opportunities for medicinal cannabis are significant and extend far beyond cultivation.

“It’s not just about growing cannabis but more about South Australia being perfectly placed to engage in the sophisticated production, processing, manufacturing and commercialisation of a pharmaceutical-grade product,” he said.

“Our state has the right blend of strengths in advanced horticulture, research and specialised manufacturing to have a real competitive advantage in this space.”

Minister Pisoni said South Australia should have access to an optimal range of treatments and services to promote the best health outcomes for patients and the community.

“There is significant public interest and support for the medicinal use of cannabis and cannabis-derived products arising from reports of symptomatic benefit in a range of medical conditions,” he said.

“Clinical trials are underway to further develop evidence about the use of medicinal cannabis across a range of health conditions that will contribute important knowledge and understanding of these medicines.    

“The Marshall Liberal Government supports the development of this industry within the existing Commonwealth regulatory framework and licencing regime.”

Event organiser LeafCann Group has also announced the launch of subsidiary Alchemy Bioservices to oversee the training and management of the emerging medicinal cannabis workforce.

LeafCann CEO Elisabetta Faenza says Australia is missing out on billions of dollars in export income by being slow to build capacity in the medicinal cannabis sector.

“Our vision is to establish South Australia as the centre of excellence for education, research, industry innovation and development for the global cannabis sector,” she said.

“LeafCann has plans to recruit up to 40 local people in its current facility before the end of 2019 and together with our partner operations, will require more than 250 employees by 2020.”

For more information on medicinal cannabis in South Australia, visit the Office of Industrial Hemp and Medicinal Cannabis website.

Recreational Marijuana Expected to be Legal in Michigan December 6

One month after Michigan voters approved a proposal to legalize recreational marijuana, the law is expected to take effect Dec. 6.

On Nov. 26, the Board of Canvassers is expected to meet and certify election results.

Recreational marijuana is expected to be legal 10 days after, according to ballot language.

Proposal 1 legalized the recreational use and possession of marijuana in Michigan for those 21 and older and will enact a tax on marijuana sales.

Nurses Help Canadians Explore Medical Marijuana

Gordon Bennett

Gordon Bennett, 96, has been using cannabis oil to treat his arthritis pain. (CTV News)

Following the legalization of recreational marijuana, a growing number of Canadians are looking to experiment with cannabis for its medicinal properties. But with some doctors unwilling to prescribe the once-illicit drug, many patients are seeking clarity in the hazy world of weed by turning to nurses.

Like thousands of other Canadians, Gordon Bennett was prescribed opioids to ease his arthritis pain. But the problem, the 96-year-old says, was that they just didn’t work.

“I could hardly get out of bed,” Bennett told CTV News from his Ottawa home. “It was hell… I had pain in my back, I had pain in my neck, I had pain in my legs — every part of my body suffered.”

Wanting to see if medical cannabis could be more effective, Bennett hired registered nurse Susan Hagar of Nurse on Board — a group that bills itself as a “nurse-led health care navigation and patient advocacy service” — to help him find the right strain and dose.

“I thought it may have been possibly addictive, but I had the courage to go through it and I found that it was not in the least bit addictive,” Bennett, who is currently using cannabis oil, stated.

Having previously resided in a nursing home, Bennett has now regained much of his independence.

“I’m living again,” he said. “Right now, I am looking after myself in a big home, I have no trouble getting around, my walking has improved and I have no pain whatsoever.”

Cannabis has been legal for medical use in Canada since 2001. And while Health Canada warns of the negative side effects of smoking marijuana, patients have reportedly successfully used products like cannabis oils, edibles and vaporizers to treat everything from arthritis to anxiety to epilepsy.

But some doctors are still uncomfortable with medical marijuana and its limited scientific backing. That’s why nurses like Hagar are increasingly taking time to learn about how marijuana works to help guide cannabis-curious patients like Bennett.

“Nurses are on the frontline with cannabis these days because we are situated closest to the patients… We have that little bit of extra time to spend with them, to help them,” Hagar told CTV News from Ottawa.

“It is my sincere hope that cannabis and the use of cannabis becomes normalized, that we sort of get over the hangover that I believe people have from the past.”

Replacing Opioids With Cannabis

Anita Rosenfeld of Ottawa also hired Hagar to help her get off opioids and treat the “unbearable” pain she experiences from arthritis and spinal compression fractures caused by osteoporosis.

“The pain was excruciating to the point where I was in bed crying all day long,” the 59-year-old told CTV News. “Basically, I did nothing. I was housebound… It was totally encompassing and I had discussed medically-assisted death.”

With the help of Hagar, Rosenfeld — who had never dabbled with marijuana before — was eventually turned on to cannabis oil.

“As I started to take it in the proper fashion and up to the appropriate level, then I just started getting better and better and better,” Rosenfeld said.

“I’ve done more in the last two weeks than I probably did in two years. I have a fuller schedule. I have a life. I have happiness. I have joy… I am able to enjoy my life I am able to contribute in a way that I haven’t been able to for five years.”

Nurses are also behind a new online service called O Cannabis, where nurse practitioners can authorize medical cannabis use and offer patients ongoing guidance and support via video link or telephone from the comfort of their homes.

Morgan Toombs, who serves as the company’s CEO, says they have already helped nearly 10,000 Canadians.

“The feedback that we’ve been getting is just extraordinary,” Toombs told CTV News from O Cannabis’ Oakville, Ont. headquarters

“This is really why we all do the work that we do. People are getting better with medical cannabis and it’s so rewarding to hear their stories. It’s incredible!”

Finding the right product

Nurses like Hagar and Toombs insist their forays into the field of medical marijuana are by no means a bid to replace physicians, but a way to fill a gap created by a new medical tool and serve the patients who want to try it.

“Patients who have tried everything, and they’ve had a really hard time finding the right medicine for them, will have often approached their doctors and are not able to get access,” Toombs claimed. “Many physicians are uncomfortable prescribing medical cannabis and so they’ll come to a clinic like ours and they’ll get the care and the help that they need.”

What’s more, Toombs added, is that nurses can take the time to help patients sort through the myriad cannabis products to find one that works best for them.

“With medical cannabis, there is a lot of follow-up care that’s required for a patient to find their right dose, to find the right products for them,” Toombs added. “And so we all know how busy doctors are… We can help take the load off the physicians.”

Source: CTV News


New Bills Filed for Marijuana Decriminalization in Texas

Decriminalization of marijuana in Texas is back on the table as nearly a half dozen bills related to the drug’s use were filed on Monday for the 86th legislative session.

Recreational and most medical uses of marijuana are still prohibited in the state, the exception being low-THC cannabis for qualifying intractable epilepsy patients under the Texas Compassionate Use Program.

Marijuana advocates, who have been pushing for decriminalization and an expansion to the medical program, have gained greater bipartisan support in recent years, said Heather Fazio, director of Texans for Responsible Marijuana Policy.

Lawmakers filed hundreds of bills Monday in advance of the deadline.

Cannabis advocates championed two bills in particular: House Bill 63, which proposes a civil penalty for less than an ounce of marijuana possession instead of arrests, convictions or a criminal record; and Senate Bill 90, which aims to allow more medical conditions to qualify for the state’s medical program, as well as offer greater protections to registered medical professionals prescribing the drug.

Rep. Joe Moody (D-78) who authored House Bill 63 noted the “swell of bipartisan support” for decriminalization of marijuana in the state.

“I’m optimistic that this will be the session we finally see smarter, fairer marijuana laws in Texas,” Moody said in a statement.

Earlier this year the Republican Party of Texas updated its official platform to support making it a civil rather than criminal offense to possess less than an ounce of marijuana. They called for a fine of up to $100, without jail time. And during a debate with Democratic challenger Lupe Valdez this year, Gov. Greg Abbott said he was open to dropping the punishment of 180 days of jail and a $2,000 fine to just a $500 fine for possession of less than 2 ounces.

The public Republican shift towards more lenient marijuana laws has some advocates feeling confident in efforts to protect recreational use of the drug as well as those who rely on it for medicinal purposes.

State Sen. Jose Menendez (D-26), who authored Senate Bill 90, said “doctors, not politicians, should determine what is best for Texas patients.”

In his bill, Menendez calls for a major expansion of the state medical cannabis program to include diagnoses such as PTSD, cancer, multiple sclerosis and more.

“Patients should not be arrested for using a medicine that is legal in every state that borders Texas, including conservative states like Oklahoma and Arkansas,” Menéndez said in a statement.

Yet Abbott has been less supportive of expanding the existing medical cannabis program, expressing concern over abuses of an expanded program.

Jackson County Sheriff, A. J. Louderback, who serves as the legislative director for the Sheriffs’ Association of Texas, echoed Abbott’s concerns arguing that medical programs in other states, and marijuana legalization in general, has led to spikes in crime and “devastating social losses.”

Since 2014, around the time Colorado legalized recreational marijuana use, crime in the state has increased. In Denver in particular, the 2016 crime rate increased 4 percent, with violent crime up 9 percent.

Yet Colorado and Denver law enforcement officials can’t say whether the crime hike is tied to marijuana legalization.

“[Property crime is] the biggest driver of our [overall] crime, and of our increases. So, can you attribute that to marijuana? I don’t think you can,” Denver Police Commander James Henning, told CNN.

For her part, Fazio of Texans for Responsible Marijuana Policy, remains undeterred in her optimism for significant marijuana reform in Texas next year.

“The time has come for prohibition to be repealed,” Fazio said.

The 86th Legislative session begins Tuesday, Jan. 8.

Source: Houston Chronicle 

Thai Lawmakers Back Legalizing Medical Marijuana

Thailand’s legislature has officially proposed allowing the licensed medical use of marijuana, making it a potential trailblazer in Asia in legalizing what used to be regarded strictly as a dangerous drug.

The National Legislative Assembly on Friday submitted proposed amendments to the Health Ministry that would put marijuana and the plant kratom, popular locally as a stimulant and painkiller, into a legal category that would allow their licensed possession and distribution under regulated conditions. The ministry will review the amendments before forwarding them to the Cabinet, which will return it to the legislature for a version that will then be voted on. The process may be completed before the end of the year.

The proposed changes would not allow recreational use of the drugs. The action was taken because of growing interest in the use of marijuana and its components to treat some medical conditions. Public hearings showed overwhelming support for the measures.

“If we let it be used recreationally, our society is not ready yet, so I want to do this first step first — the issue of making medicine,” said Somchai Sawangkarn, a lawmaker who proposed the amendments. “From allowing the making of medicine, maybe in six months or a year’s time, if society is ready, it could become a food supplement. … And eventually that could lead us to its recreational use.”

Somchai said the legislature would consider introducing further amendments to address concerns such as fears that marijuana would be too accessible to children or reservations that only some large private companies would potentially be granted licenses to produce medicine derived from the plant.

The legislature says recent studies have shown that marijuana extract has medicinal benefits, which has prompted “many countries around the world to ease their laws by enacting legal amendments to allow their citizens to legally use kratom and marijuana for medicinal or recreational purposes.” It adds that despite being classified as an illegal drug, many patients have used marijuana to treat their diseases.

Somchai told The Associated Press that pushing through the amendments was difficult because they affected the interests of big pharmaceutical companies.

“I’ve been working on legislation in parliament for the past 12 years, and I have to admit that this has been one of the toughest ones to pass because it affects the benefits of large transnational pharmaceutical companies as they sell chemotherapy, morphine, and so on, and we want to introduce something really cheap as an alternative,” he said.

Source: Hawaii News

The Cannabis Product That Won’t Get You High

The wave of marijuana legalization in recent years has more and more Americans toking up legally and experimenting with everything from candy to skincare products infused with cannabis. But, there’s one type of cannabis product that’s been getting a lot of buzz — and, it won’t even get you high.

CBD products have become increasingly popular in recent years, as more and more producers market CBD as the new “it” drug for the health and wellness set — one that has been touted as a pain reliever and a treatment for anxiety, among other potential applications. Last year, consumer sales of CBD products topped $350 million in the United states, more than triple the amount sold in 2014, and various estimates predict the market could reach $2 billion within the next two to four years.

So, what exactly is CBD — and why are you able to get your hands on it even if you don’t live in a state where cannabis is legal?

What is CBD?

The term “CBD” is a nickname for cannabidiol, which is one of several cannabinoids, or chemical compounds, that are found in cannabis and hemp plants. Of course, the most famous cannabinoid is tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, which is the main psychoactive component in marijuana (aka, the part that gets you high). Because CBD is not psychoactive, it does not create the same buzzy effects typically associated with marijuana when ingested.

Think of CBD as THC’s straight-edge cousin. But just because CBD won’t get you high, that doesn’t mean it has no side effects or potential uses.

What does it do?

Because of the overall legal ambiguity around the cannabis plant (marijuana is federally illegal, but dozens of states have legalized it for medical and/or recreational purposes in recent years), the jury is still out, somewhat, when it comes to the potential benefits and medical applications of cannabidiol.

Still, CBD is already commonly used to relieve some symptoms of anxiety, including insomnia, and there have been some studies that show it to be effective in those cases. Other studies have shown that CBD could have anti-inflammatory properties, and many CBD products are marketed for relieving chronic pain, such as arthritis. And multiple studies have found CBD to be an effective treatment for seizures, and there are various CBD products that are used by patients with epilepsy. However, major health agencies like the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, National Institutes of Health and the World Health Organization have all stated in recent years that additional CBD testing and research is necessary.

How do you use it?

Once the CBD compound is extracted from cannabis and hemp plants, it is typically packaged in the form of concentrated oil or cream.

For trendy wellness products, the oil is mixed or infused in any number of other goods, including pills, vaporizers, beauty creams, shampoos and edibles like candy, mints and flavored sparkling water. You can even get CBD-infused pet treats that are marketed to owners of dogs and cats suffering from anxiety.

And there’s a growing culture of CBD cocktail enthusiasts, spurred on by the likes of Food & Wine magazine and Gwyneth Paltrow’s growing health and wellness empire, Goop.

Recently, CNBC Make It profiled the New York City bar, Adriaen Block, where customers can choose from an entire menu of CBD-infused cocktails and food items, like a cheeseburger with CBD-infused sauce. (This reporter sampled the restaurant’s CBD-infused menu items, which were tasty — the CBD oil did not overpower — and I did feel a bit relaxed afterward, though the alcohol could have played a role in that.)

Meanwhile, in California, lawmakers recently cracked down on restaurants and cafes serving everything from coffee and juice to other foods infused with CBD.

For medicinal purposes, creams and balms that claim to treat pain can be rubbed directly on the skin and CBD oils can be taken orally, often with a dropper that deposits a drop or two in your mouth.

Is it safe?

Again, the more studies and medical research that focus on CBD, the more will be known about its side effects and potential medical benefits. For what it’s worth, in December 2017, the World Health Organization declared in a report that “cannabidiol does not appear to have abuse potential or cause harm.” The WHO also noted that CBD could have “therapeutic value” for epileptic seizures, but that further study is warranted to determine CBD’s potential medical use.

Then, in June, the FDA approved GW Pharmaceutical’s Epidiolex, a CBD-based drug for treating epileptic seizures — marking the first time the agency has ever approved a drug derived from marijuana.

However, it’s also worth noting that there have been several instances where the FDA has issued warnings to companies for illegally marketing CBD products with overblown and unrealistic claims, including that they can cure cancer.

But, is it legal?

Well, much like with other cannabis products, that’s kind of a gray area. On the federal level, any CBD products derived from cannabis plants are completely illegal, unless they are approved by the FDA (which only includes Epidiolex at the moment), the Drug Enforcement Agency said in September. The DEA even told VICE recently that the federal law makes no distinction between CBD derived from cannabis or hemp (a cannabis plant species with an especially low concentration of THC grown legally in roughly 40 states, mostly for industrial purposes). In other words, the official stance of the federal government seems to be that CBD products are illegal whether they are derived from cannabis or hemp.

However (and this is very important), as has typically been the case with legal marijuana, the federal government mostly looks the other way while individual states decide how to treat CBD. As such, most states allow CBD products in some form, usually for medical purposes. The 30 states that have legalized medical marijuana include CBD products in that protection, while a number of other states have specific CBD laws that allow for those products in some form, so long as they also contain no more than a miniscule amount of THC. Only four states consider all cannabis-derived products, including CBD, to be illegal: Idaho, South Dakota, Nebraska and Kansas.

Meanwhile, CBD derived solely from hemp could soon be legal everywhere. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is backing a new legislation that would remove hemp from the DEA’s list of controlled substances, which would make it legal across the country (along with products made from hemp).

In short, CBD’s legal status in the U.S. may still not be entirely clear, but with the potential for billions of dollars in sales in the coming years, it doesn’t seem to be going away anytime soon.

Mexico Moves Toward Major Rollback of Marijuana Prohibition

Mexico’s next interior minister plans to submit a bill to create a medical marijuana industry and allow recreational use, the Congress website showed on Tuesday, in what would be a big step by the incoming government to shake up the country’s drug war.

Senator Olga Sanchez, Mexican President-elect Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador’s choice for interior minister, told Reuters the bill would be presented this week in Congress.

If the bill passes, Mexico would join Canada, Uruguay and a host of U.S. states that permit recreational use of the drug and allow its commercialization. It would be one of the most populous countries to roll back prohibition.

Mexico, which banned marijuana in the early 20th century, is still a major supplier of illicit weed to the United States. It has been racked by a decade of conflict between cartels over supply routes for heroin, cocaine and synthetic drugs to its northern neighbor.

Lopez Obrador, a veteran leftist who takes office Dec. 1, has promised major changes to Mexico’s approach to the war on drugs, suggesting a negotiated peace and amnesty for some of the very people currently targeted by security forces.

In the 26-page bill posted on the Congress website, Sanchez wrote that Mexico’s cannabis prohibition has contributed to crime and violence, adding that in the 12 years since Mexico launched a war on cartels, 235,000 people have been killed.

“The policy of prohibition arises from the false assumption that the problem of drugs should be tackled from a penal focus,” wrote Sanchez, a former Supreme Court magistrate.

“The objective can’t be to eradicate the consumption of a substance that’s as prevalent as cannabis is,” she added.

Although the coalition led by the president-elect’s National Regeneration Movement (MORENA) party has a majority in both houses, it includes a conservative party that has in the past opposed some socially progressive policies, meaning the bill may face hurdles.

“It will be presented on Thursday, without fail,” Sanchez said. Legislation in Mexico’s two-house Congress often moves slowly, and after being submitted, the bill would have to pass committees before reaching a vote.

NEW INDUSTRY

The bill would permit companies to grow and commercialize marijuana. Individuals would also be allowed to cultivate plants for private use, as long as they register in an anonymous government listing and produce no more than 480 grams (1 lb) of marijuana per year.

Smoking pot in public places would also be permitted.

Cannabis producers would be banned from hiring minors or selling the drug to them.

Mexico’s Supreme Court last week ruled that an absolute ban on recreational use of marijuana was unconstitutional, effectively leaving it to lawmakers to regulate consumption of the drug.

Support for legalization has strengthened in Mexico in recent years as violence soars. Former Mexican President Vicente Fox has been an outspoken advocate for legalization, joining the board of Khiron Life Sciences Corp in July.

Bill Gates lauds futuristic toilets in China

Khiron is one of several listed Canadian weed companies. Stocks in the sector have been on a tear over the past year in anticipation of strong demand following last month’s legalization.

Fox also joined the board of Hightimes Holding Corp, which owns the marijuana enthusiast magazine High Times, earlier this year.

Since 2006, Mexico has used military might to fight drug gangs, which have splintered into smaller groups battling over trafficking routes and territory.

The country saw more than 31,000 murders last year, the highest total since modern records began, according to government data.

Source: Reuters

Mexico Moves Toward Major Rollback of Marijuana Prohibition

Mexico’s next interior minister plans to submit a bill to create a medical marijuana industry and allow recreational use, the Congress website showed on Tuesday, in what would be a big step by the incoming government to shake up the country’s drug war.

Senator Olga Sanchez, Mexican President-elect Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador’s choice for interior minister, told Reuters the bill would be presented this week in Congress.

If the bill passes, Mexico would join Canada, Uruguay and a host of U.S. states that permit recreational use of the drug and allow its commercialization. It would be one of the most populous countries to roll back prohibition.

Mexico, which banned marijuana in the early 20th century, is still a major supplier of illicit weed to the United States. It has been racked by a decade of conflict between cartels over supply routes for heroin, cocaine and synthetic drugs to its northern neighbor.

Negotiated Peace & amnesty

Lopez Obrador, a veteran leftist who takes office Dec. 1, has promised major changes to Mexico’s approach to the war on drugs, suggesting a negotiated peace and amnesty for some of the very people currently targeted by security forces.

In the 26-page bill posted on the Congress website, Sanchez wrote that Mexico’s cannabis prohibition has contributed to crime and violence, adding that in the 12 years since Mexico launched a war on cartels, 235,000 people have been killed.

“The policy of prohibition arises from the false assumption that the problem of drugs should be tackled from a penal focus,” wrote Sanchez, a former Supreme Court magistrate.

“The objective can’t be to eradicate the consumption of a substance that’s as prevalent as cannabis is,” she added.

Although the coalition led by the president-elect’s National Regeneration Movement (MORENA) party has a majority in both houses, it includes a conservative party that has in the past opposed some socially progressive policies, meaning the bill may face hurdles.

“It will be presented on Thursday, without fail,” Sanchez said. Legislation in Mexico’s two-house Congress often moves slowly, and after being submitted, the bill would have to pass committees before reaching a vote.

New Industry

The bill would permit companies to grow and commercialize marijuana. Individuals would also be allowed to cultivate plants for private use, as long as they register in an anonymous government listing and produce no more than 480 grams (1 pound) of marijuana per year.

Smoking pot in public places would also be permitted.

Cannabis producers would be banned from hiring minors or selling the drug to them.

Mexico’s Supreme Court last week ruled that an absolute ban on recreational use of marijuana was unconstitutional, effectively leaving it to lawmakers to regulate consumption of the drug.

Support for legalization has strengthened in Mexico in recent years as violence soars. Former Mexican President Vicente Fox has been an outspoken advocate for legalization, joining the board of Khiron Life Sciences Corp. in July.

Khiron is one of several listed Canadian weed companies.

Stocks in the sector have been on a tear over the past year in anticipation of strong demand following last month’s legalization.

Fox also joined the board of Hightimes Holding Corp., which owns the marijuana enthusiast magazine High Times, earlier this year.

Since 2006, Mexico has used military might to fight drug gangs, which have splintered into smaller groups battling over trafficking routes and territory.

The country saw more than 31,000 homicides last year, the highest total since modern record-keeping began, according to government data.

Source: Voa

Wisconsin Voters Say Yes

A Howard, Wis. woman with chronic pain wants the opportunity to see if medical marijuana can help her conditions. Sarah Kloepping, USA TODAY NETWORK-Wisconsin

Voters in a range of Wisconsin counties and two cities Tuesday said yes to non-binding questions about whether marijuana should be legal in the state.

Voters in Dane, Milwaukee and Rock counties said the legislature should legalize marijuana for recreational use. In La Crosse County, partial returns showed about 55 percent of voters favor legalizing marijuana for recreational use.

Referendums appeared headed for passage in each of the 10 counties and one city in which voters were asked only if marijuana should be legal if prescribed by a doctor for medical conditions.

In each case, voters favored legalizing medical marijuana by margins of two to one, or better.

“I’m delighted that three-fourths of Brown County voters sent a message that we are in favor of legalizing medical marijuana, and want them to move forward to change laws so people who are sick or suffering can use marijuana as medicine,” said Laura Kiefert, a resident of Howard, Brown County, who a long-time chronic pain sufferer.

“It’s time for those state legislators to let go of their prejudices against cannabis,” she said, “and hear the will of the people.”

The referendums are non-binding, meaning they don’t change state laws, or ordinances in communities in which they were held. They were intended as a way to send a message to state lawmakers that it it’s time to change the laws.

A 2018 Marquette Law School Poll of Wisconsin voters found a majority believe marijuana should be legalized.

In the poll, 61 percent of respondents said marijuana should be fully legalized and regulated like alcohol, while 36 percent opposed legalization. A poll in July 2016 had found 59 percent of respondents supported legalization; 39 percent opposed it.

Recreational Referendums

Figures from the counties where voters were asked if recreational marijuana use should be legal for people 21 years and older:

Dane County: With 235 of 246 precincts reporting, residents favored legalization by a 246-348-64,999, a margin of more than three to one.

Milwaukee County: With 468 of 478 precincts reporting, the vote was 217,628-93,116 in favor of legalization.

La Crosse County: With 15 of 55 precincts reported, about 55 percent of voters favoring legalization.

Rock County: Almost 70 percent voted yes, 46,589-20,746.

Medical only

Results from communities where voters were asked only about medical marijuana:

Brown County: With 44 of 97 precincts reporting as of 11:50 p.m., almost 74 percent of people casting ballots favored legalization, 46,812-16,649. Those figures didn’t include votes cast in the city of Green Bay.

Clark County: Voters favored legalization, 7,674-3,673.

Forest County: Voters were favoring legalization 3,090-824, a margin of more than three to one.

Kenosha County: Approved, 59,638-7,753. That’s a margin of almost 8 to 1.

Langlade County: Voters were favoring legalization, 7,061-2,071. 

Lincoln County: Voters favored legalization, 10,612-2,517. That’s a margin of more than four to one.

Marathon County: Approved, 49,137-11,115, a margin of better than four to one.

Marquette County: With 18 of 19 precincts reporting, voters favored legalization, 5,019-1,462. That’s a margin of more than three to one.

Portage County: Voters favoring legalization by better than four to one: 19,527-3,867. 

Sauk County: SVoters favored legalization by roughly four to one, 22,684-5,673.

City of Waukesha: Approved 23,731-7,243, a margin of better than three to one.

Currently, Wisconsin and 14 other states allow use of only low-THC cannabidiol products by prescription. Wisconsin limits cannabidiol products to the treatment of seizure disorders. THC, or tetrahydrocannabinol, is the chemical in marijuana that produces a sense of euphoria.

Multiple Questions

Eau Claire County, Racine County and the city of Racine asked multiple questions about marijuana legalization.

In Eau Claire County, voters approved of legalizing marijuana for medical and recreational use by people 21 or older, provided it was taxed and regulated like alcohol and proceeds from taxes used for education, healthcare, and infrastructure. 

The vote was 29,564 for complete legalization to 14,958 for legalization only by prescription for medical use; 6,982 said it should remain illegal.

Racine County asked voters three questions about marijuana legalization. The numbers, with 63 of 69 precincts reporting:

  • Voters said marijuana should be legalized for medicinal use, 64,339-11,420.
  • Voters said marijuana be legalized and regulated for people 21 and older, 44,688-30,602.
  • Voters said marijuana sales should be taxed for state and local revenue, 60,156-14,376. 

The city of Racine asked four questions. the results, with 34 of 36 precincts reporting:

  • Voters said cannabis should be legalized for adult recreational use, 16,528-8,344.
  • Voters said cannabis be legalized for medical use, 21,720-3,054.
  • Voters said cannabis sales should be taxed and the revenue used for public education, health care, and infrastructure, 20,552-4,166.
  • Voters said cannabis should be decriminalized, 17,615-6,950.

Other states’ laws

Comprehensive medical marijuana programs are allowed in thirty-one states plus Washington, D.C., Guam and Puerto Rico.

Washington, D.C.; and nine states have legalized small amounts of marijuana for adult recreational use. Vermont was the most recent; its law went in effect on July 1.

Twenty-two states and the District of Columbia have decriminalized small amounts of marijuana.

Source: Green Bay Gazette

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